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Statement of Slovak Foreign Affairs Ministry on 50th anniversary of Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia

Statement of Slovak Foreign Affairs Ministry on 50th anniversary of Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia

21.8.2018 | Vyhlásenia a stanoviská ministerstva

21 August 1968 is one of the crucial dates in Slovak and European history. The occupation of Czechoslovakia by the armies of five states of the Warsaw Pact, led by the Soviet Union, the taking over a sovereign state the citizens of which were seeking, in a democratic way, solutions to accumulated problems, had serious consequences for our society. The invasion by foreign troops had forever buried the ideals that were lived by the contemporaneous society in Czechoslovakia and trampled efforts for democratic transformations of the state.

 

The Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs of the Slovak Republic sees the intervention of the “allies” of 21 August 1968 in Czechoslovakia as an inadmissible act of aggression. We welcome that the top officials of the Russian Federation repeatedly have distanced themselves from the invasion. At the same time, however, we must sharply react to attempts by some circles in the Russia to trivialize this act and get rid of their historical accountability. History cannot be rewritten. The military intervention fifty years ago was part of the perverted logic of the Cold War, the return of which we, as a sovereign state, EU and NATO member, and member of other relevant international organizations, must not allow. We wish to build our future on strategic alliances within which partners respect and trust each other.
 


It is more than symbolic that Slovakia at the times of a jubilee anniversary of the invasion of Czechoslovakia has been preparing for its chairmanship over the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe. In 2019, we wish to play in the OSCE the role of a responsible conflict mediator, including the so-called frozen conflicts that continue in the territories of participating states of this organisation almost thirty years after the Berlin Wall and Iron Curtain came down.